Can increasing your fruit and vegetable intake improve your skin colour and appearance? A University of Newcastle study is searching for the answer with the hope it could be a powerful motivator to encourage people to eat healthier.

PhD candidate with the University of Newcastle’s Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, Ms Kristine Pezdirc* said current evidence shows that eating more fruits and vegetables is linked to a reduced risk of many chronic diseases including stroke, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some specific cancers.

“Fruit and vegetables get their bright colours from phytonutrients called carotenoids. After digestion these carotenoids appear in your skin and can give you a healthier “glow”, which potentially can be used as a novel motivator to eat more fruit and vegetables.” 

This is the first study to test whether varying the amount of carotenoids from fruit and vegetables can improve your skin colour and appearance, and your well-being.” 

READ our media release.

PhD candidate with the University of Newcastle’s Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, Ms Kristine Pezdirc said current evidence shows that eating more fruits and vegetables is linked to a reduced risk of many chronic diseases including stroke, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some specific cancers. Photo: Newcastle Herald

Nutrition Week: Eat yourself beautiful – Newcastle Herald

FORGET expensive skin creams – a University of Newcastle study is aiming to find out if chomping on a carrot or grabbing a handful of berries can make your skin more beautiful.

The research could serve as an extra incentive to eat your five serves of vegies and two pieces

Focusing on women aged 18 to 30, the study’s participants are being given a box of healthy produce each week over 2 months.

PhD candidate Kristine Pezdirc said they would then measure the amount of carotenoids in the skin.

Fruit and vegies key to healthy skin – NBN News

Eating your fruit and vegetables is something that’s drummed into us from an early age.
Now a study could give young women a new reason for doing so – it’s examining a link between good eating, and looking good.