RESEARCH: Plain cigarette packs impact taste and prove less appealing to smokers

At the University of Newcastle we have conducted studies of the impact of the plain cigarette packs on smokers’ ratings of appeal and perceptions of the product. We have found that plain packs are rated by long-term smokers as less appealing and attractive. The participants of our research also said that they had noticed deterioration in the quality of tobacco. They also reported that they now struggled to tell the difference between the tastes of different cigarette brands now that packs all looked the same.

OPINION: Embracing inner feminist for more effective communication

Professional communicators strive to get people to think in particular ways. Whether it’s a health agency promoting immunisation or a local company flogging surfboards, the underlying techniques are quite similar.

The techniques aim to engage audiences and get them to build in their minds the meanings intended for them. Those working in the business would rarely, if ever, stop to consider the impacts of their work from a feminist view.

OPINION: Youth unemployment escalates risk of social unrest

Unemployment and under-employment is impeding young people’s efforts to earn, establish savings, develop professional experience and secure jobs with long-term prospects – all of which were fairly normal situations for previous generations.
But changing employment patterns and slow economic growth leave young people susceptible to the risk of becoming entangled in long-term unemployment or under-employment, or being unable to find stable work that is either only seasonal or part-time.

ANZAC: Her Story

Maud Butler was so desperate to be part of World War 1 she disguised herself as a soldier and stowed away on a boat headed for Egypt.

The fascinating story of the Kurri Kurri woman is just one being explored as part of University of Newcastle historian, Associate Professor Victoria Haskins’ new research project.

Benefits-based fees plan under attack

BY TIM DODD THE AUSTRALIAN FINANCIAL REVIEW OCTOBER 22, 2012 The controversial call by the Grattan Institute think tank for students to pay more for university degrees has been challenged by one of the authors of the federal government’s review of higher education funding. Professor Louise Watson of the University of Canberra criticises the Grattan […]

Is $6bn a year on degree subsidies justified?

BY TIM DODD THE AUSTRALIAN FINANCIAL REVIEW OCTOBER 22, 2012 Who would have thought universities would be so allergic to the spirit of critical inquiry? More than two months ago, Andrew Norton of the Grattan Institute released his Graduate Winners paper questioning whether the government should subsidise the cost of university degrees that lead to […]

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